Skip to content
Nov 25 / Caro

Thomas’s Birthday – Recovery

The hour or so between Thomas’s entrance to the world and me being ready to be transferred back to the Delivery Suite felt a lot longer than a normal hour. Ian had been cuddling Thomas the entire time (and been weed on by his son too!) He’d also been weighed in at 7lb and 11oz. Right on the 50th centile, completely in proportion with no sign of an increased abdominal circumference that suggests diabetic macrosomia. All my “big baby” fears  vanished instantly with that news. And I couldn’t help but feel just a little it proud of myself.

Once I’d been stitched up there was a lengthy delay in waiting for a suitable bed to transfer me on to. I had expected to be transferred to the recovery area, but that never happened. Instead they eventually procured a proper bed from the Post Natal ward, which meant I’d only need to be transferred once. Once the bed arrived, I was unceremoniously hauled from the operating table across to it ready to be moved directly back to my room on Delivery Suite. I could not wait to finally be able to cuddle my boy properly, but the moment I’d moved, I knew I was going to be sick. Being sick when your stomach is empty from hours of no food or fluid AND you’re numb from the mid chest down is a very surreal sensation.

Eventually the heaving subsided and finally Thomas was placed in my arms. Until that moment I hadn’t realised that I had a baby shaped hole right there. He filled it instantly, snuggled tightly against my body. I felt spaced out from the drugs and surgery, not to mention lack of food and sleep, but I could not stop grinning as I stared down at my tiny, dark haired boy. As we were wheeled along the corridors to my room, I felt a swell of pride in my heart, to be holding my beautiful boy for everyone to see.

My parents were already waiting in the room as we arrived and I invited them to “Meet your Grandson” through yet more tears.

The next few hours are a bit of a blur. A different midwife came to take care of me and Thomas, which included getting him straight on to my breast and testing his blood sugar for the first time. My heart broke just a tiny bit at the shrill squeal he let out as they pricked is heel for the blood sample. Having kept him safe for so long, I felt guilty that his entrance to the word was being marked with pain because of MY condition and the problems it might be causing for him. Fortunately his level, whilst on the low side, was within normal range for a newborn. And with the midwife’s help, he latched straight on to feed. There was never any need for the frozen syringes of colostrum we’d prepared in advance, as he sucked like a pro and his second and third blood sugar levels were absolutely fine.

I do remember being insanely itchy throughout this time. I was holding Thomas to me with one hand and scratching my skin all around him. It was an absolutely skin-crawling, insatiable itch. Apparently it was a reaction to a drug that I’d been given and once I was given an intravenous antihistamine, the itch subsided. I was also sick again, with a cardboard sick bowl balanced unceremoniously on poor Thomas’s head as he continued to eat!

Family

After a couple of hours, I was allowed to eat. The bendy straws we’d been advised by so many people to pack in my labour bag finally came in handy allowing me to drink a cup of tea whilst feeding Thomas and not being able to move to sit up properly! I also demolished a slice of toast in about three seconds flat. I may not have had a natural delivery, but it’s still true that the first cup of tea and slice of toast following the birth of your child tastes much better than any tea or toast that has ever gone before!

The first of many!

The midwife and my mum helped Ian to change the original nappy that had been put on – his first ever nappy change – and dress Thomas in the yellow sleepsuit with two little elephants on that we’d chosen especially. We took lots and lots of pictures. Surprisingly I look half decent in a few of them.

Ian looked absolutely wrecked, however. Neither of us had had much sleep since Saturday night. I really wasn’t keen on the idea of an emotionally charged and over tired drive home, even though it wasn’t far. Fortunately my parents were able to take Ian home and we could leave our car in the hospital car park overnight. One less thing for me to worry about. At this stage I was still waiting to be transferred upstairs to the post-natal ward, but he looked so dead on his feet that I urged them to leave.

I have no idea what time I was finally transferred, once again holding Thomas to me. I was still pretty numb and starting to get itchy again. As soon as we arrived in my room on the post-natal ward, the midwife settled Thomas in to his little plastic crib, and he happily fell asleep. I could have watched him all night, twitching and snuffling in his sleep, but I was exhausted myself after what I can safely say was the biggest day of my life. It didn’t take too long for my own eyes to close.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail
Leave a Comment

TOTS 100 - UK Parent Blogs